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My Top 11 Tokyo Eats
Saturday January 14, 2017 | Lasse Laursen

This list is almost 2 years overdue now, but given that I still often offer this advice to travelers to Tokyo, I thought I'd finally get my butt in gear and write this stuff down for all posterity. So without further ado, here are my top 11 Tokyo eats that I'd recommend all visitors to Tokyo to go to at least once!

Sushizanmai - In Akihabara, in the Yodobashi building on the 8th Floor

Style: Sushi
Price Range: Low - Medium

Sushizanmai is a franchise, so you'll find plenty of its stores around Tokyo. This one I recommend as it's first of all what's known as a kaiten sushi (meaning conveyor belt) sushi, which is slightly more affordable than their standard store shops. Furthermore, I am an avid fan of arcade games, so this place would always get a visit from me whenever I was in Akihabara! Do yourself a favor and order whatever tuna special they have on and promise me that you will go to the trouble of ordering directly from the sushi chefs. Yes, yes, I know being a foreigner can be intimidating, but even just pointing at the fish on the menu will get across the inteded message. The only word you absolutely need to learn is 'Sumimasen', i.e. Excuse me! Say that, point at the menu and use your fingers to indicate how many you'd like. If you want to also taste the very best sushi you can get there (or any other sushi-joint) then you'll also have to learn to say 'Aburi toro' - which will net you the braised fatty tuna. It's simply to die for. I usually ended up eating myself full for about 3400 Yen without sparing any quality.

Numazuko - In Shinjuku underground

Style: Sushi
Price Range: Medium

Numazuko is somewhat more upscale than Sushizanmai in my opinion, and their price range does reflect this. You'll also have a bit more trouble deciphering the menu here, but any extrovert should not have too much trouble. Again, just point/ask away and you'll get through a lovely meal. What you can expect with the higher price is that almost all of the fish is less cold, whereas with Sushizanmai you may get unlucky and see the chef grab it straight from the cooler (prior to serving) forcing you to either wait to consume the delicious fish or lose some of its taste.

Genki Sushi - In the Shibuya neighborhood

Style: Sushi
Price Range: Low

This is more or less the McDonalds of Sushi in my eyes. Not in terms of being so pre-processed and sugary that you'll hit a high, then crash, and be hungry two hours later. More in terms of the most low-end offering with ingredients that are just good enough to eat. I'd recommend it all the same just for the experience, and it is worth mentioning that I'd recommend Genki Sushi 100 times more than McDonalds. The entire serving system is automated via a small tablet along with moving conveyer-belts. The menu offers multiple languages so you won't have to worry about misunderstandings. Finally, I will stress that the Sushi is nowhere near the quality of either of two aforementioned places, so set your expectations accordingly.

Gyu kaku - In a basement in the Shibuya neighborhood

Style: Korean Barbecue
Price Range: Medium-High

Another fairly priced favorite of mine. This place offers an endless supply of meat in more varieties than you can fathom. It's not the highest quality, but it's no slouch either. I highly recommend getting one of their all you can eat deals. Yes - you read correctly, deals. They have multiple all-you-can-eat options depending on how fancy the meats are that you'd like to dine on. This particular establishment tends to get quite busy during regular dining hours so expect to wait to be seated (sometimes up to an hour) or just go a bit later/earlier than the general population. If they don't offer you an English menu upfront you can usually get one if you ask, however note that it may not be as up to date as the Japanese one, so I'd recommend holding on to both during your dining experience.

Barbacoa - Any franchise location in Tokyo

Style: Brazilian Barbecue
Price Range: Medium-High

This is one of the more upscale choices. Given the price tag attached, I highly recommend visiting the restaurant during lunch time for a cheaper experience. Their all-you-can-eat offer is what you'll want to take, and do yourself a favor and perhaps pass on the chicken and sausages that they'll offer up first. After those two meats, you'll be served an endless rotation of various delicious cuts each more delicious than the last. Beware you may find yourself rolling home rather than walking from this place. It is nothing short of supremely delicious. Given its popularity, reservations are a must, usually a day or two in advance. My one and only knock against the place is that the all-you-can-eat menu only includes water/juice unless you go all the way and include beer and wine.

Frijoles - Any franchise location in Tokyo

Style: Mexican
Price Range: Medium

This is what I'd call good upscale take-away food. Their steak filled burrito is simply to die for - especially when you're nursing a hang-over from going hard at Womb from the other night. Personally I always stuck with their rice variety in Grande with sour-cream - hold the guac. Nothing against guacamole but the whole thing is so delicious on its own that it never seemed necessary.

Takahashi in Gotanda

Style: Japanese Yakitori (Meat skewers)
Price Range: High

This place used to have a Michelin star which I believe it has unfortunately lost. That being said, I would still say this place offers a phenomenal Japanese dining experience in the 6000-10000 Yen range. I'd highly recommend taking the chef's choice menu to start and then supplying with whatever skewers you find appealing. I personally cannot recommend the miso-Chicken skewers enough.

Yakitori in Roppongi

Style: Japanese Yakitori (Meat skewers)
Price Range: Low

This is a bit of a sad story. I used to live about 10 minutes on foot from this place and only found out about it during the last two months of my stay in Tokyo. For the price range it is in, and considering its location, it offers phenomenal value. Given that it is located in/near Roppongi, this makes the place even more unique. I'm sure you can find other yakitori places that are just as good/affordable, but this is one of the ones I've been to several time with terrific results. Note that it offers near zero help for foreigners as the entire menu is in Japanese and without any pictures.

Nabe-zo - any franchise location in Tokyo

Style: Shabu Shabu (Thinnly slice meat in hot pot with veggies)
Price Range: Medium

Another lovely all-you-can-eat offering which I recommend visiting at lunch time for an incredibly affordable experience. The cuisine is Japanese and the place offers both a standard meat all-you-can-eat experience and a deluxe meat all-you-can-eat experience. I recommend the former as the latter didn't really offer anything significantly better in my opinion. Don't hesitate to ask for more sauce if/when you run out, and a single replacement of the hotpot water is also included in the offering.

Basically any Izakaya in Tokyo

Style: Informal Japanese Gastropub
Price Range: Low-Medium

I thought a bit about mentioning some specific Izakaya's throughout Tokyo, but honestly I think you'll be generally well off with most of them. In which case, you may as well pick one close to your travels. Lots of guides on the internet can tell you where to find the very best in terms of price and service/food. I generally recommend going to an Izakaya because it's a very affordable Japanese dining experience. During rush hour you'll find they're frequented by a lot of post-work salarymen. Note that like many of Tokyo's restaurants frequented by salarymen, it is virtually impossible to avoid smoke. Also good luck finding one that serves rum and coke. They do exist, but they're few and far in-between.

Firehouse

Style: Burgers
Price Range: Low-Medium

Yes - burgers are not Japanese. But that doesn't mean that burgers are not tasty in Tokyo. This place holds a special place in my heart being near my place of work (The University of Tokyo) as well as being run by an exceedingly friendly gentleman who is fluent in English. If you come across Daimon, please tell him 'Hello' from yours truly. I personally recommend their mushroom burger, but pretty much any option on the menu is a solid pick.

Honorable Mention: Wendy's

Style: Burgers
Price Range: Low-Medium

Yes, yes... Wendy's is perhaps now the farthest we can stray from either Japanese or 'upscale' food, but Wendy's burgers are nothing to scoff at. I frequented their (now closed/moved) Roppongi branch more than I care to admit to. Their burgers are exceedingly tasty, and I personally recommend the deluxe double patty version with the works, which will cost you just shy of about 1000 yen.

And that's it... The entire list. Glad I got that out of my system. Now you go to either of these places and get some of their goodness into your system!

 


PlanMixPlay pre-alpha testing *now*!
Wednesday December 28, 2016 | Lasse Laursen

Pre-Alpha testing of PlanMixPlay has started!

Excitement, ballons, confetti, clowns, and trumpets!

Even more exciting is that you, yes you, can actively participate in said testing. To keep expectations in check, let me state that PlanMixPlay is very feature slim. It currently cannot compare to current live performance software on any conceivable level. However - given time, testing, and care we here at PlanMixPlay HQ hope it can offer something new and unique previously unseen in the live interaction space.

In the future there'll probably be a forum, a trello board (to track development), and a series of other neat things to look at and use, but for now, if you're keen on giving PlanMixPlay a spin in its pre-alpha state, head over to http://www.planmixplay.com/register, sign up for an account, and proceed to downloading PlanMixPlay.

Happy holidays, and have a happy new year!


Planmixplay irregularities part two
Sunday November 27, 2016 | Lasse Laursen

It has been another month with neither an update, nor a (PlanMixPlay) show in sight. The short story is that life has gotten a bit in the way. The slightly longer one also tells of some odd internet connectivity issues that I'm trying to sort through. Hopefully what's coming on the other end will be worth the wait however. I'm once again tempted to talk a lot about plans and ideas, but so often these things turn to nothing before they were ever anything. Once you get involved in a creative circle you start to notice how some individuals talk a lot about plans, but never follow through. Sometimes... You'll notice this person in the mirror. It's important to take a few lessons from this.

First, that we all have a tendency to do this to some degree. It's alluring to talk about fantastic thoughts/ideas/plans. Especially if you feel that you'd actually be able to execute on them. It makes them seem more real. Despite the fact that they're no more real than most peoples hopes for winning the lottery. But take some comfort from this. It is - if nothing else - an equalizer. We can all hope for big things that we'll never manage. What really separates people - to me - is how big and often this talk occurs vs. what comes into being. I'd speculate that perhaps only 1% of the things I imagine become real, and perhaps only 20% of the ones I talk about do. I guess what I'm getting at is, ideally, we should all talk less and do more.

The second is actually the most important lesson I think. That what other people say vs. do doesn't matter. It can be beneficial as a motivator, to convince yourself that you're making actual headway while this other person is merely talking about making headway. But at the end of the day - that's irrelevant. Who knows - this other person might catch a break far sooner than you, and then the headway you've made will perhaps not matter. So at the end of the day - you may as well just do your utmost regardless of what anyone else is doing.

Which brings me the to the final part of this post. What I've been thinking about in terms of making headway. The time has come to start trying to create some real encapsulated output with PlanMixPlay. The danger with a project such as PlanMixPlay is that - while it does resemble a lot of existing software - the concept is slightly different fundamentally. Which means trying to explain the subtle difference is difficult. To the point where you're better of showing it. I've tried often enough to explain PlanMixPlay to interested parties to realize that in order to actually make real headway, I need to have some tangible and workable examples of what I'd like to achieve. I need to get to a place where someone will be keen to ask 'So is this ready to go?', or perhaps better, not even ask, just assume that it is.

But creating an encapsulated output ready for propagation is not enough. The former sentence reveals why it is not. Propagation. It must be easy to spread. You'll hear a lot more from me when I have something that's both, but for now all I can say is that I'll see if I can't get at least a show in sometime during December, provided that the technical issues subside.

Here's hoping!


PlanMixPlay show irregularities
Saturday October 1, 2016 | Lasse Laursen

Hello friend,

I hope this day finds you well. Hmmm. Starting to sound an awful lot like one of those well-to-do Nigerian princes who mean so well, but generally tend to end up scamming you for all you're worth. Their e-mails always start off in such an open and friendly manner, and often have a lot of upfront well wishing about ones health and well-being. But you and I have barely begun discussing today's important agenda, and I've already digressed...

For that, I apologize. But I also apologize for sad news that I must deliver. Moving and migrating is tough business and quite time-consuming. Consequently the weekly PlanMixPlay shows that I do on SlayRadio.Org will be occurring in a little more haphazard fashion, for the brief but foreseeable future (i.e. the next month or two). On the bright side, I can dedicate some of this recently granted non-broadcasting time to developing PlanMixPlay, which in the long run hopefully stand to benefit us all!

So keep an eye on the schedule, and if you'd like, you can also follow the happening re. PlanMixPlay on the official twitter account!

Have a fantastic day!


Codility is an automated service to test programming and logic puzzle skills. I've taken numerous tests via Codility, to the point where I felt a simple Framework for both C++11 and Python might be of some help to others. As every Codility task boils down to a single function taking input and returning output, I created a framework that mimics this functionality, along with printing some helpful text to allow you to more quickly get an overview of whether or not your method performs as expected. So the frameworks essentially enable you to save some time which might otherwise be spent printing input/output.

Both frameworks are available on Github: Python | C++11

strongly recommend you make use of the Python version, unless you're forced deliver a solution in C++11 instead. The main reason being that you'll get more done with less code in Python. I say this as a developer with over a decade of experience using C++. It might be different for you, but for me, it was worth getting back into Python just to ease these tests.

I'll close by saying that I've read a number of blogs/articles/comments for, and against, Codility as a tool to evaluate potential employees. If we, for a moment, disregard how beneficial the tool is (or isn't) for both the employee and employer, I find the most interesting aspect about Codility, is how its proliferation as an evaluative tool causes a significant side-effect. I think most individuals using Codility will agree that their tests generally do not resemble real-world programming tasks. A saying, I think is fitting here, is You get what you test for. Not only is this true - Codility will filter skilled logic puzzle solvers, and not necessarily good programmers - but it breeds an artificial drive to become good at puzzle solving. So the more Codility is used, the more prospective employees will be forced to train themselves via Codility's convenient lessons. It is of course in Codility's interest to have its test takers study and become better. Perhaps the skills learned via Codility may be applicable, but to me it feels more like it creates a new artificial hoop to pass through. A bit like a personality test.


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